British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment

British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment reveals how a new sense of the national climate emerged in the eighteenth century from the systematic recording of the weather, and how it was deployed in discussions of the health and ...

British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment

Enlightenment inquiries into the weather sought to impose order on a force that had the power to alter human life and social conditions. British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment reveals how a new sense of the national climate emerged in the eighteenth century from the systematic recording of the weather, and how it was deployed in discussions of the health and welfare of the population. Enlightened intellectuals hailed climate’s role in the development of civilization but acknowledged that human existence depended on natural forces that would never submit to rational control. Reading the Enlightenment through the ideas, beliefs, and practices concerning the weather, Jan Golinski aims to reshape our understanding of the movement and its legacy for modern environmental thinking. With its combination of cultural history and the history of science, British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment counters the claim that Enlightenment progress set humans against nature, instead revealing that intellectuals of the age drew characteristically modern conclusions about the inextricability of nature and culture.

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British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Jan Golinski
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-11-15 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Enlightenment inquiries into the weather sought to impose order on a force that had the power to alter human life and social conditions. British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment reveals how a new sense of the national climate emerged in the eighteenth century from the systematic recording of the
Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: James Beattie, Edward Melillo, Emily O'Gorman
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-12-18 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

19th-century British imperial expansion dramatically shaped today's globalised world. Imperialism encouraged mass migrations of people, shifting flora, fauna and commodities around the world and led to a series of radical environmental changes never before experienced in history. Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire explores how these networks shaped ecosystems, cultures
Weather, Migration and the Scottish Diaspora
Language: en
Pages: 294
Authors: Graeme Morton
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-28 - Publisher: Routledge

Why did large numbers of Scots leave a temperate climate to live permanently in parts of the world where greater temperature extreme was the norm? The long nineteenth century was a period consistently cooler than now, and Scotland remains the coldest of the British nations. Nineteenth-century meteorologists turned to environmental
The Contagious City
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Simon Finger
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-05-15 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

By the time William Penn was planning the colony that would come to be called Pennsylvania, with Philadelphia at its heart, Europeans on both sides of the ocean had long experience with the hazards of city life, disease the most terrifying among them. Drawing from those experiences, colonists hoped to
Europe and the British Geographical Imagination, 1760-1830
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Paul Stock
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-10 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Europe and the British Geographical Imagination, 1760-1830 explores what literate British people understood by the word 'Europe' in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Was Europe unified by shared religious heritage? Where were the edges of Europe? Was Europe primarily a commercial network or were there common political practices