Five Classic Spenser Mysteries

This exclusive eBook bundle brings together five of the best early Spenser mysteries, including the first three in the series: THE GODWULF MANUSCRIPT (Book 1) GOD SAVE THE CHILD (Book 2) MORTAL STAKES (Book 3) EARLY AUTUMN (Book 7) A ...

Five Classic Spenser Mysteries

“Robert B. Parker has taken his place beside Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and Ross Macdonald,” The Boston Globe once wrote. But over the course of a legendary literary career, Parker single-handedly reinvented American detective fiction for the modern world with his irreverent, idealistic protagonist, Spenser. This exclusive eBook bundle brings together five of the best early Spenser mysteries, including the first three in the series: THE GODWULF MANUSCRIPT (Book 1) GOD SAVE THE CHILD (Book 2) MORTAL STAKES (Book 3) EARLY AUTUMN (Book 7) A CATSKILL EAGLE (Book 12) From a murdered student at an elite university to a star Red Sox pitcher accused of throwing games, from the affluent Massachusetts suburbs to the backstreets of Boston and the backwoods of Maine, these immersive novels are grounded in place, peopled by a diverse cast of characters, and bursting with Spenser’s signature humor and attitude. Praise for Robert B. Parker’s Spenser novels “Crackling dialogue, plenty of action and expert writing . . . Unexpectedly literate—[Spenser is] in many respects the very exemplar of the species.”—The New York Times “They just don’t make private eyes tougher or funnier.”—People “Parker has a recorder’s ear for dialogue, an agile wit . . . and, strangely enough, a soupçon of compassion hidden under that sardonic, flip exterior.”—Los Angeles Times “A deft storyteller, a master of pace.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer “Spenser probably had more to do with changing the private eye from a coffin-chaser to a full-bodied human being than any other detective hero.”—The Chicago Sun-Times “[Spenser is] tough, intelligent, wisecracking, principled, and brave.”—The New Yorker

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Five Classic Spenser Mysteries
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“Robert B. Parker has taken his place beside Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and Ross Macdonald,” The Boston Globe once wrote. But over the course of a legendary literary career, Parker single-handedly reinvented American detective fiction for the modern world with his irreverent, idealistic protagonist, Spenser. This exclusive eBook bundle brings
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