What the Music Said

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

What the Music Said

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

More Books:

What the Music Said
Language: en
Pages: 215
Authors: Mark Anthony Neal
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-09-13 - Publisher: Routledge

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
New Black Man
Language: en
Pages: 194
Authors: Mark Anthony Neal
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-02-11 - Publisher: Routledge

Ten years ago, Mark Anthony Neal’s New Black Man put forth a revolutionary model of Black masculinity for the twenty-first century—one that moved beyond patriarchy to embrace feminism and combat homophobia. Now, Neal’s book is more vital than ever, urging us to imagine a New Black Man whose strength resides
Soul Babies
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Mark Anthony Neal
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-02-01 - Publisher: Routledge

In Soul Babies, Mark Anthony Neal explains the complexities and contradictions of black life and culture after the end of the Civil Rights era. He traces the emergence of what he calls a "post-soul aesthetic," a transformation of values that marked a profound change in African American thought and experience.
Looking for Leroy
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Mark Anthony Neal
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-04-22 - Publisher: NYU Press

Mark Anthony Neal’s Looking for Leroy is an engaging and provocative analysis of the complex ways in which black masculinity has been read and misread through contemporary American popular culture. Neal argues that black men and boys are bound, in profound ways, to and by their legibility. The most “legible”
African American Culture and Legal Discourse
Language: en
Pages: 257
Authors: R. Schur
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-12-07 - Publisher: Springer

This work examines the experiences of African Americans under the law and how African American culture has fostered a rich tradition of legal criticism. Moving between novels, music, and visual culture, the essays present race as a significant factor within legal discourse. Essays examine rights and sovereignty, violence and the