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Mrs. Gaskell's Personal Pantheon
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Robert C. G. Gamble
Categories:
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher:

Books about Mrs. Gaskell's Personal Pantheon
Mrs. Gaskell's Personal Pantheon
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: GAMBLE
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-08-31 - Publisher:

This new book vividly presents previously undiscovered biographical information about Elizabeth Gaskell, the author of Mary Barton, Cranford, The Life of Charlotte Brontë, and Wives and Daughters. It also provides much contextual material about Harriet Martineau, the Brontë family and the history of Manchester. In particular it casts significant fresh
Private Theatricals
Language: en
Pages: 132
Authors: Nina Auerbach
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

"Everyman" as actor on life's stage has been a recurrent theme in popular literature--epecially persuasive in these times of powerful electronic media, celebrity hype, and professional image-makers--but the great Victorians exuded sincerity. Nina Auerbach reminds us that all lives can be subversive performances. Charting the notable impact of the theater
Private Sphere to World Stage from Austen to Eliot
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Professor Elizabeth Sabiston
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-04-28 - Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

Emily Dickinson's poem, 'This is my letter to the World/ That never wrote to Me --', opens the Introduction, which focuses on the near-anonymity of nineteenth-century women novelists. Close readings of works by five British novelists—Jane Austen, Charlotte and Emily Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot—offer persuasive accounts of the
Private Sphere to World Stage from Austen to Eliot
Language: en
Pages: 214
Authors: Elizabeth Jean Sabiston
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

Though the focus is on British novelists, Sabiston's discussion of the Anglo-American connections in the factory novels of Elizabeth Gaskell and the slavery writings of Harriet Beecher Stowe has particular relevance for its demonstration of how the move from the private to the public sphere enables and even compels the