Proportionality and Deference Under the UK Human Rights Act

A rigorous analysis of the relationship between proportionality and deference under the Human Rights Act.

Proportionality and Deference Under the UK Human Rights Act

Revision of thesis (Doctoral)- London School of Economics, 2010.

More Books:

Proportionality and Deference Under the UK Human Rights Act
Language: en
Pages: 291
Authors: Alan D. P. Brady
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-05-03 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Revision of thesis (Doctoral)- London School of Economics, 2010.
The Principle of Proportionality in the Laws of Europe
Language: en
Pages: 187
Authors: Evelyn Elllis
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999-03-19 - Publisher: Hart Publishing

This book of essays examines the meaning of proportionality in a number of different contexts.
Judicial Reasoning under the UK Human Rights Act
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Helen Fenwick, Gavin Phillipson, Roger Masterman
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-09-06 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Judicial Reasoning under the UK Human Rights Act is a collection of essays written by leading experts in the field, which examines judicial decision-making under the UK's de facto Bill of Rights. The book focuses both on changes in areas of substantive law and the techniques of judicial reasoning adopted
Proportionality Under the UK Human Rights Act
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Aaron Baker
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Hart Publishing

The principle of proportionality has long been the key mechanism in Europe for deciding whether state action has encroached on human rights. Prior to the UK's adoption of the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA), proportionality enjoyed only sparing patronage by UK courts, and then typically only when EU obligations required
Constitutional Review under the UK Human Rights Act
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Aileen Kavanagh
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-05-07 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Under the Human Rights Act, British courts are for the first time empowered to review primary legislation for compliance with a codified set of fundamental rights. In this book, Aileen Kavanagh argues that the HRA gives judges strong powers of constitutional review, similar to those exercised by the courts under