The Papers of Thomas Jefferson Volume 29

From. George. Washington. du. Motier. de. Lafayette. MONSIEUR Mount Vernon 29 Juillet 1796 Si quelque chose en Amérique est capable d'adoucir le sentiment de mes peines, et de faire renaitre dans mon ame flêtrie par le découragement, ...

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson  Volume 29

In the twenty-two months covered by this volume, Jefferson spent most of his time at Monticello, where in his short-lived retirement from office he turned in earnest to the renovation of his residence and described himself as a ''monstrous farmer.'' Yet he narrowly missed being elected George Washington's successor as president and took the oath of office as vice president in March 1797. In early summer he presided over the Senate after President John Adams summoned Congress to deal with the country's worsening relations with France. As the key figure in the growing ''Republican quarter,'' Jefferson collaborated with such allies as James Monroe and James Madison and drafted a petition to the Virginia House of Delegates upholding the right of representatives to communicate freely with their constituents. The unauthorized publication of a letter to Philip Mazzei, in which Jefferson decried the former ''Samsons in the field and Solomons in the council'' who had been ''shorn by the harlot England,'' made the vice president the uncomfortable target of intense partisan attention. In addition, Luther Martin publicly challenged Jefferson's treatment, in Notes on Virginia, of the famous oration of Logan. Jefferson became president of the American Philosophical Society and presented a paper describing the fossilized remains of the megalonyx, or ''great claw.'' At Monticello he evaluated the merits of threshing machines, corresponded with British agricultural authorities, sought new crops for his rotation schemes, manufactured nails, and entertained family members and visitors.

More Books:

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 29
Language: en
Pages: 746
Authors: Thomas Jefferson
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-06-05 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

In the twenty-two months covered by this volume, Jefferson spent most of his time at Monticello, where in his short-lived retirement from office he turned in earnest to the renovation of his residence and described himself as a ''monstrous farmer.'' Yet he narrowly missed being elected George Washington's successor as
A Disease in the Public Mind
Language: en
Pages: 384
Authors: Thomas Fleming
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-07 - Publisher: Hachette UK

By the time John Brown hung from the gallows for his crimes at Harper's Ferry, Northern abolitionists had made him a “holy martyr” in their campaign against Southern slave owners. This Northern hatred for Southerners long predated their objections to slavery. They were convinced that New England, whose spokesmen had
News from the Archives
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: United States. National Archives and Records Administration
Categories: Archives
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992 - Publisher:

Books about News from the Archives
The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Retirement Series, Volume 14
Language: en
Pages: 784
Authors: Thomas Jefferson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-03-06 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

The 637 documents in this volume span 1 February to 31 August 1819. As a founding member of the University of Virginia Board of Visitors, Jefferson helps to obtain builders for the infant institution, responds to those seeking professorships, and orchestrates the establishment of a classical preparatory school in Charlottesville.
The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 36
Language: en
Pages: 824
Authors: Thomas Jefferson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-06-05 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

The period covered by this volume brings to a conclusion Thomas Jefferson's first year as president. On 8 December he communicates his first annual message to Congress: peace between France and England is restored; a rise in population will increase revenue and help abolish internal taxes; the standing army can